Monty: I wouldn't trade my career for Tiger's

Montgomerie says Tiger would have got "18,19" majors if he had a "settled home"

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Submitted by Charlie Lemay on

 

Colin Montgomerie says he would not trade his career for Tiger Woods’, adding the 14-time major champion would have beaten Jack Nicklaus’ record of 18 majors if he had a “settled home”.

Hall of Famer Montgomerie infamously never won a major, but captured a record eight European Tour Order of Merit titles, which he has previously stated is harder to do than win a major.

The Scot currently plays on the Champions Tour, winning three majors – a Tour Woods has no interest in.

“I never won a major,” Montgomerie said “Tiger won 14. But would I trade my career for Tiger’s? No. I started out this game a pretty good golfer and finished in the Hall of Fame.

“I feel I have overachieved. So how could I say I wish it were better? People will say, `Well, he didn’t win a major.’ And, yes, I would have liked to shut them up by winning one. But that’s my only regret, really. Great that I have won senior majors, which has quieted the odd person.

“I’ve made mistakes. We all make mistakes. But I’ve had a long career. I don’t think Tiger will be out here at 53. He might say, `I don’t need the money.’ But it’s not just money. It’s self-esteem. Self-esteem is huge in life. You walk a wee bit taller, having done something well. I like this life. I like meeting new people. I like the travel. I love the life. Whether it’s for everybody, I can’t say.

“If Tiger loved the life, I can’t say. For Tiger, I think there was a certain record in the back of his mind: 18, 18, 18. Or 19. Got to get to 19 majors. Whether he enjoyed the tour life, I don't know. But that number was there—19.

“To be seen as the best ever. And really, he’s well beyond 19. There are the 14 majors, plus the 15 World Golf Championship events. In those, he’s beating 60 of the best players in the world! So to me, his number is 29. And then compare his 79 Tour wins to Sam Snead’s 82. Number 100 in Sam Snead’s day was a club pro who could beat Snead for a day, but never over four days. Today, No. 100 can win any week.

“Nineteen has been such a focus for him. If Tiger had his children with him fulltime, a wife, a settled home, he could have gotten to 18, to 19. I know from my own life how hard it is to play golf when your life at home is not settled. After that Thanksgiving night changed everything, he no longer had a private life. A private life by the term itself is a private life. You have a public life and a private life. And when the private life becomes public, it’s dangerous. It hurt. It hurt him. It hurt the game of golf.

“I know how difficult it is, when you’re not living with your children. I speak for myself, and I’m sure I speak for others. It’s hard to come out here and focus. Every par becomes a bogey. Every bogey becomes a double. You just about manage to get from a green to the next tee if you make a birdie. You make a bogey, and it all floods back. And you’re not focused on what you’re doing. You’re not focused at all. I feel for him that way. I do. I feel for any man in that situation. Whether it’s self-inflicted or not.

Woods pulled out of last week’s Dubai Desert Classic because of back spasms, in just his second event following his return to competition after 15 months on the sidelines because of injury.

He will not play in this week’s Genesis Open or the Honda Classic, and is currently in the Los Angeles area receiving treatment.