TaylorMade R15 Rescue review

Will Taylormade's latest rescue match its lauded R15 driver?

Charlie Lemay's picture
Tue, 3 Feb 2015
0

TaylorMade’s R15 rescue is a workable, neutral launching club that feels more like an iron than a wood.

The clubhead is smaller and squarer than we are become accustomed to seeing from the American giants, which suggests TaylorMade has taken inspiration from hybrid specialists Adams, a company it bought for $70 million in 2012.

TaylorMade pioneered white crowns, which supposedly aids alignment, and it has returned to this rhetoric in its R15 range. It is a shame TaylorMade are not offering the hybrid in black, as they do with the R15 driver, as traditionalists may be deterred.

The R15 rescue’s main attribute is workability, aided by its headshape and feel, and this will suit the better player. The feel is harder than your average hybrid, but still satisfying, and this means the player receives maximum feedback from each strike. While a soft-feeling wood may be an enjoyable experience for the user, it often dulls the information sent to the player from the clubface and this leads to a loss of control.

When compared to other better player hybrids, the R15 compares favourably in terms of forgiveness but it doesn't come in bucket loads which is to be expected from a club designed for low handicappers. 

In regards to length it is middle of the pack. The hybrid does not boast the extra distance provided by the R15 driver but this should not be a concern as it is not an attribute better players should be seeking in a hybrid - workability and feel should be top of that list.

The hybrid is the only club in the R15 range that does not boast weight adjustability but the hybrid does allow players to alter the loft by 1.5 degrees either way which will change both trajectory and distance.

RRP: £189
Shaft: Fujikura Speeder 77 Evolution (graphite)
Lofts: 17, 19, 21, 24

TaylorMade’s R15 rescue is a workable, neutral-launching club that feels more like an iron than a wood. 

The clubhead is smaller and squarer when compared with the American company's other hybrids, which suggests TaylorMade has taken inspiration from hybrid specialists Adams, a company it bought for an estimated $70m (£49m) in 2012.

TaylorMade pioneered white crowns, which supposedly aids alignment, and after abandoning the idea in the SLDR range, it returns in the R15 line. It is a shame TaylorMade is not offering the hybrid in black, as it does with the R15 driver, as traditionalists may be deterred. 


The R15 rescue’s main attribute is workability, aided by its headshape and feel, and this will suit the better player. The feel is harder than your average hybrid, but still satisfying, and this means the player receives maximum feedback from each strike. While a soft-feeling wood may be an enjoyable experience for the user, it often dulls the information sent to the player from the clubface and this leads to a loss of control.

When compared to other better-player hybrids, the R15 compares favourably in terms of forgiveness but it doesn't come in bucket loads which is to be expected from a club designed for low handicappers. 

In regards to length it is middle of the pack. The hybrid does not boast the extra distance provided by the R15 driver but this should not be a concern as it is not an attribute better players should be seeking in a hybrid - workability and feel should be top of that list.

The hybrid is the only club in the R15 range that does not boast weight adjustability but the hybrid does allow players to alter the loft by 1.5 degrees either way which will change both trajectory and distance.

Verdict


The TaylorMade R15 rescue is strictly for the better-player or solid ball striker. It has a squarer profile than previous TaylorMade models and offers workability and an enjoyable, hard feel.

RRP: £189
Shaft: Fujikura Speeder 77 Evolution (graphite)
Lofts: 17, 19, 21, 24

 

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