Dress code

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Dress code
Darren Clarke's T shirt has already been picked up on in another thread, but what about Ian Poulter's trousers? I know the guy likes to dress differently at times, but Union Jack strides? Now they ARE different!

Have you heard Ian Poulter's comments about his trousers, I've got to agree, the games about having fun, and if Ian thinks he can liven it up, then good luck to him, mind you, his dress sense must have helped to raise his profile no end!

Have you seen himtoday? White plus fours (or whatever they are called), not so sure about them!

Now thats just silly ;)I wonder what he's thinking for tomorrow, his hat choice is almost as bad as his trouser choice. Nice to know there is someone supporting my own group.... the fashionably impaired!

If he wants to make a fashion statement he should wear a kilt on the last day......could you imagine the crowds reaction!!!

How about a leather kilt, that should cause a few splutters into the pink gin at the clubhouse.

Golf is fun but there is a dress sense that should be kept -- tee shirts are out as far as I am concern -- we do not want it to end up like football with the supporter painting their faces.Wrinkly

I booked last year in November with golfspain.com for 7 golfers for 2 rounds and 2 extra rounds for 4 golfers golf spain overcharged me by 300 euro I still have not received a refund after many phone calls to spain. So when booking golf in Spain try not to book with golfspain.com. I see Golf magic has a link to golfspain on your home page

Generally speaking, i thought the standard of dress was high. However when the officials/management of any course permit players amateur or pro to dress down with what is in fact a glorfied tee shirt, or dress outrageously by exhibitionists, then sooner or later they attract people who that sort of thing appeals to .Soccer is the classic example where players are allow to remove shirts spit and generally misbehave.If we want well ordered and behaved spectators, then the standards that we desire have to apply from the top down.

This attempt at brightening up the game of golf, which i think is fine as it is,could possibly send out the wrong idea to the wrong type of people.If Ian Poulter wants to get noticed more on TV then he should try to get on to the first page of the leaderboard more often.

The wrong sort of people!Just what are the wrong sort of people?I see the reference made to football which is a fair one when we think of flag clad individuals with painted faces at some of the England matches over the past years....hooligans I guess is what we are talking about. Well I think that idea is flawed.Look at Rugby, flag clad individuals with painted faces....but not hooligans! These are people who enjoy their sport and belive in fair play.If the "wrong sort" want to play I cannot believe that Ian Poulter will encourage them to spend hundreds of pounds on equipment just so that they can infiltrate and destroy our fine sport.There are always a minority of the "wrong sort" in all sports that have a large following and believe it or not they are already here....bandits in your local comp? players who break or can't even be bothered with, the rules? Slow players who refuse to allow faster groups through? How many of these wear Union Jack trousers, I would guess at none as they would not want to make themselves stand out, be recognisable.So who will be encouraged by Ian Poulter....youngsters, yes those people who are generally a bit shorter than us and live in our homes free of charge.....of course we don't want "their sort" after all we were never youngsters were we?For god's sake, they are the lifeblood of our sport, we used to be them....I think, although judging by some club members I have met i'm not totally convinced.......and with them will come a few of the "wrong sort", just like those bandits that started when we did, just like the rule breakers who did when we did, just like the inconsiderate slow players who did when we did.When I first started I was a biker, yes I rode a big, smelly, noisy machine. I wore a leather bike jacket and had long hair. But I played to the rules and always allowed people through if they were faster. Today I'm approaching 40, I don't have a leather jacket, motorbike or longhair anymore but I am still the same person. So I turn up today and I am accepted as the right sort but would those of you who talk about IP encouraging the "wrong sort" have considered me the wrong sort 20 years ago, bloody right you would.So, just who are the wrong sort of people?

Quite right, Gabriel. I've seen a few posts of that nature in GM, and it makes my blood boil. They just reinforce all the stereotypes of golf as a stuffy game played by crusty old duffers.All we need now is for someone to chip in with "...and a spot of national service woulf soon sort them out".

I think a spot of national service would soon sort them out.:-)

Thanks Alan, as you can probably tell it makes my blood boil too.There are so many threads with those types of comments on GM at the moment I was spoiled for choice as to where to vent my fury!

Ah Nick, good timing, can you give us some guidance as to the definition of the "wrong sort" in the Rules Of Golf?

It's both satisfying and stimulating for me to know that you all have at last found a place where you can 'vent your fury' and 'state your opinions' and where other passionate golfers will listen and respond accordingly. We seem to have weeded out the self-promoters and the obsessive arguers and instilled healthy debate that is also closely monitored not only by the golf industry but by the golf media and the authorities. In my opinion, Ian Poulter has done golf a service by using himself as a clothes peg for a new generation of potential golfers - there's an unconfirmed report that he has a financial stake in Golf Punk too, but I doubt it. It will be interestring to see how the magazine survives during the winter months when 75 per-cent of golfers hibernate.If as a result of the Poulter (Fashion) Parade, youngsters are tempted to take up the game, following his Pied Piper example, they will find there is no shortcut to success. They will have to practice and dedicate themselves to the game just like the rest of us - and will find that to start with they will have to conform to The Rules to get the most out of this exhilarating sport.IMHO there are no 'wrong sort of people' playing golf merely a handful of 'members' at most courses who spout only long enough from their bar stool to hit their first tee shot out of bounds. Then the rest of us take their selfish observations in context. ED

Bob, I agree with your point about the impact of Ian Poulter's dress sense. Golf is one of only a few games/sports where clothing is not really important in a practical sense, except the shoes maybe which are not really obvious to outsiders anyway. A down side to this is that youngsters and some older newcomers are deprived of a shiny new uniform that often provides that initial "hook" (unfortunate choice of word perhaps) and immediate sense of belonging: I can still remember the excitement of getting my first pristine karate outfit and new football strips.I realise that clothing is superficial and I personally don't attach a lot of importance to it, but much like an appealing book cover, it often makes a person pick up and try that book instead of the hundred others on the shelf around it. If the book is genuinely good on its own rights and has substance, just like golf, then the reader will get much out of it and seek to get more involved. If it all looks bland and boring to the uninitiated then no one will make the effort to get to the substance, no matter how good it is.I must admit I don't quite understand the term "wrong type of people". I can think of no other sport where the commitment required to get a "reasonable return on investment" is so heavy. OK, so you may get an occasional headcase who comes along to try it out, but he's not going to stay long in the game if he doesn't understand what it's about and adopt a minimum of attitude (i.e. respect). And I personally would not include dress sense in with respect. We all like to think that we don't judge people by the appearance, but we all do. All we can do is try to keep an open mind. A few days ago I posted a true story about a fist-fight that broke out on a course - definitely the worst behaviour displayed by golfers I have ever seen on a golf course. The people involved were middle-aged and worked for a big multi-national company. They were very well dressed, and were probably middle-managers. It's only anecdotal, but worth keeping in my mind when I find myself prejudging some "annoying" golfers up ahead who are unshaven, have got piercings or are wearing weird clothes.

Gabriel, Bob and David, very well put. I cannot see what all the fuss is about with regard to Poulter's dress sense and as others have said, if it encourages youngsters to take up the game, more power to his elbow. My seven year old was watching the Open with me when IP appeared wearing those trousers, it immediately got his attention, even more so when I told him that he was from Stevenage which is just down the road. Guess who is number one fan is now! So what if he didn't win, he brought nothing but good publicity to the game.With regard to stuffy members that is one thing I cannot stand about the game although thankfully I do not see it very often, our club is reasonably relaxed. However, I took a GM member (who shall remain nameless) for a round as my guest and there were some comments made about his ear-ring, the comments were not made to us but I found out about them later. I'm not sure if the GM member was aware of them, and if you were I can only apologise for the members ignorant behaviour.The only time I have encountered any 'problems', and I use that term loosely, is from older members, I presume retired who appear to be stuck in a time warp and must lead such shallow, anal lives that they feel they must whinge about anything and everything which doesn't fit into their idea of utopia. Aaah! That feels better.

There appears to be a consensus of opinion that: 1. Youngsters cannot be attracted to the game unless the dress code that applies in many clubs is relaxed. Now whilst those who subscribe to this belief are perfectly entitled to their opinion, it would be interesting to know if there is any empirical evidence based on market research to support this point of view.I can only speak for clubs of which I have experience as a member. Both have thriving and growing junior memberships who are subject to the same code of dress as other members. This code does note allow jeans, trainers, track suits,tee shirts, or shirts worn outside of trousers etc.It does insist on a jacket and tie in the clubhouse after 7.30pm. To the best of my knowledge we have not lost any of our junior members as a result.2. Judging by the comments made there seems to be an effort to blame 'old duffers' for the insistence on these standards. Once again I would be interested in any factual evidence to support such an assertion.Again speaking only within my direct experience, it is true to say that at the AGM's the dress code is an item that is usually raised. It is interesting to note that year on year there is an overwhelming vote to maintain the existing standards, and since the AGM's seem to be attended in equal numbers by both 'old' and 'young' (the elderly do not have exclusivity on being duffers when it comes to golf)one can draw one's own conclusions.

I'm not sure where you get point 1 from. Ian Poulter was not breaking any dress code therefore why should the dress code be relaxed. The only issue as I see it with the dress code is possibly with T-Shirts and I don't think that is an issue in my humble opinion, I think most of us are happy to leave that one to the individual clubs.What Ian Poulter was wearing was more traditional in terms of the items of attire than that which most of us wear these days, the issue seems to be with the colour scheme and personally I have yet to play at any club (although my experience is limited) that has the colours of the attire that is worn stipulated in their rules.If what I have written above is correct then the remainder of your points are immaterial.Ian is colourful in both attire and personality, whats the problem with that?And no one has suggested as far as I can see that youngsters are only attracted by unusual dress codes, only that some youngsters who see Ian as exciting to watch because of his attire and personality will be attracted to the game.....just as John Daly's big hitting, big personality attracted some BUT NOT ALL.

Peter, no one is suggesting that kids will be put off golf due to a lack of new innovative dress sense. However, I think it's fair to say that MORE kids will be attracted to it initially, albeit on a superficial level, if there is no weird dress code to follow and even a fun element in seeing one of the game's young stars wearing "funky" trousers. It's a simple question of appeal. No one has the figures on this, but if it's not true then an awful lot of ad agencies and marketing departments are going to close down (maybe not a bad thing after all).I'm glad your club is thriving, but I bet most of the kids there have parents that are or were members, either there or somewhere else. Kids whose parents have played golf will get "initiated" at some point or another anyway, irrespective of Ian Poulter's choice of trousers. The general point being implied was to do with getting more "non-golf" youngsters interested in the game or at least seeing what it's all about.Coming from a non-golfing family, I began playing golf on municipal courses until we moved to a small town with it's own local club. As a 15-year old, being told that I couldn't play because I didn't have a collar, albeit politely and in a friendly way, had the same effect as if they'd said "It's Friday, so only grey socks can be worn before midday". Utterly meaningless to most kids. A bit stunned, I retreated home to find a suitable shirt, although I wasn't entirely sure what I was looking for. I didn't feel miffed, just puzzled. I'm still puzzled even now, as I've never really heard a rational explanation as to why a collar is needed. Anyway, I went on to play many happy rounds there, wearing my collar. It didn't change me or my behaviour one little bit, much in the same way that I don't think the kids in any club would go "bad" if tomorrow they could suddenly wear trainers. The point I'm making is that if a non-golfer popped in "to see what this golf lark is all about" he would be put off by seemingly irrational and discriminatory codes. It has happened to few people close to me more recently, and from a non-golfer's point of view, the consensus from them is that golf is for old fogies. Sad, as I don't agree with the take on their experiences and believe most clubs are actually trying to encourage golf and have no real discrimination in mind.The only reasons I've heard for justifying certain dress codes all had negative, conservative connotations ("don't want to see standards drop", "keeps out the riff-raff", "because that's the way it is",

I don't recall mentioning Ian Poulter in my mail. I was simply commenting on dress in particular.On the contrary, subscribers to this forum have indicated that youngsters are put off by the dress code that applies. What is wierd about about wearing a normal shirt with a collar and normal trousers? As for the neccessity to wear different colours on different days , now that is wierd, or unusual and not something I've encountered before.

That's right Peter, you didn't.......read the whole thread, it was started about Ian Poulters attire and has been about Ian's attire all the way through so if you didn't want your comments connected with IP then you joined the wrong thread or didn't read it first.How many posts on this forum have mentioned ALL youngsters being put off, that was what you were claimimg in your last post.And who the hell said there is anything wrong with wearing a collared shirt with normal trousers? I wear them and I would bet just about every contributor to these forums wears them.....we just don't see the need to call people weird just because they want to dress differently. I am also sure that in general we all abide by our clubs dress codes.......so if we do what is your problem.....just name the person, Ian Poulter or anyone else, who has broken any dress code. I haven't heard of anyone breaking a dress code.My son and my friends daughter like to wear bright colours on the course and they do not break any dress codes, they do not cause any problems for other golfers, they are always polite and play to the rules AND THEY ARE NOT F*$KING WIERD!!!!!!!

Peter,Re:- your point -2. Judging by the comments made there seems to be an effort to blame 'old duffers' for the insistence on these standards. Once again I would be interested in any factual evidence to support such an assertion.You are quite right, there is no evidence, and I agree with you. But it wasn't the point that I (and others) were making.I suggested that, to an outsider, issues regarding golf "standards" "dress codes" and "wrong sorts" reinforces the outsider's stereotype regarding golf as the preserve of the crusty old duffer. And therefore puts people off taking up the sport - many of which I'm sure are not the "wrong sort".

You're quite right Peter, there is nothing weird about wearing normal trousers and and a collar. What is weird, to people outside golf, is HAVING to wear normal trousers and a collar (whatever "normal" means).In two or three years time people wont even be talking about Tiger Woods, Westwood and the other pros about their collarless shirts. It will just be the norm, along with those that still wear shirts with collars. The (non-existant) rationale that said they couldn't wear beforehand will just look silly.

Just one point, you'll never EVER see a footy hooligan 'Flag draped and face painted' This is the typically ignorant picture the media paints of these people.And whats wrong with keeping out riff raff? I dont want a shedload of bloody Pikeys digging my course up!

I reckon that is the point Harry. The "wrong sort" are out there but they aren't the ones dressed in bright colours with coloured hair.....they like to remain anonymous else they would be too easy to spot.In other words, we ain't gonna keep em' out by discriminating against those who look or dress differently to us because they are not the problem.

I can spot em though....Burberry hats, Stone Island jumpers....dead giveaway!

Gabriel,For reasons that I am unaware of you seem determined to twist my words. If that is to be the general tone of these threads then I would rather not be a part of them. As far as I'm aware the thread is Dress code. However your view is that I cannot comment on that generally. I.E Unless I mention Ian Poulter.I must not say anything.I did not say that anyone had broken the dress code. I did comment on what are I believe to be glorified tee shirts, which do break the dress code of the clubs that I belong to. Whether you have chosen to distort what I wrote by design, or because you're unwilling to entertain any other point of view than your own, or both is of little or no interest to me.What I have noted about your comments is that you find it necessary to use capitals, which of course is the internet equivalent of shouting and that you also have to resort to profanity in an effort to get your point across.If you are unable to debate principles without being vulgar and aggressive, perhaps it's you who is on the wrong thread. Should you persist in such a manner, that I will treat your comments with the contempt they deserve by simply ignoring them.

It has not been my intention to twist your words however, this is an open forum and as such I am as entitled to question, comment, agree and disagree with the views of others as they are free to do the same to my views.<br><br>If you wish to ignore my comments then, to be honest, it is no skin off my nose but if I am wrong then I welcome your rebuttal but that does not mean that I have to agree with your comments.<br><br>To avoid confusion I will use the magic of cut and paste so as not to twist the words of anyone.<br><br>"On the contrary, subscribers to this forum have indicated that youngsters are put off by the dress code that applies." If you are talking about modern dress then I think you will find at least as many comments giving the opposite view if you are not then maybe you would like to comment.<br><br>"What is wierd about about wearing a normal shirt with a collar and normal trousers? As for the neccessity to wear different colours on different days , now that is wierd, or unusual and not something I've encountered before." I have no problem with normal shirts or trousers but I take offence at the use of the word wierd as my own and my friends children like to wear colourful outfits yet they are still abiding by the clubs dress code.<br><br>"There appears to be a consensus of opinion that:<br>1. Youngsters cannot be attracted to the game unless the dress code that applies in many clubs is relaxed." What has actually been said is that the likes of Ian Poulter's attire at the open makes our game more attractive to some youngsters who would not be attracted otherwise, surely this is not a bad thing.<br><br>"Generally speaking, i thought the standard of dress was high. However when the officials/management of any course permit players amateur or pro to dress down with what is in fact a glorfied tee shirt, or dress outrageously by exhibitionists, then sooner or later they attract people who that sort of thing appeals to." I certainly took your "dress outrageously" comment to refer to Ian Poulter, if I am wrong maybe you can clarify? But to say "they attract people who that sort of thing appeals to" does strike a nerve in me, who exactely are these people, are they lower class? hooligans?<br><br>I won't cut and paste your comment re trainers, jeans, etc. I will however note that I have yet to see a comment stating that these things should be allowed. There seems to be concensus that some standards need to apply. With respect to T-Shirts, I personally don't wear them on the course but I wouldn't have a problem with someone who did as long as it is allowed in the dress code of the particular course. In fact the R&A and USGA seem to have set the standard for golfers by allowing them to be worn in their tournaments.<br><br>If we are not prepared to accept people who look and dress differently to ourselves then we are being discriminatory and I would not want to partake of a sport which encourages discrimination of any kind.<br><br>With respect to my comments re Ian Poulter. The thread is entitled "Dress Code" but if you read the start of and at least the first five messages in the thread they are only talking about Ian Poulter so if I have incorrectly attributed some of your comments as being towards IP then maybe you can see why.<br><br>I would be interested to read your response. Whatever you choose, I will continue to post (and sometimes SHOUT and occasionally use such language as may be caused by others comments that make my blood boil)in these forums until such time as Bob or one of the others who run GM choose to censor me. I will also continue to read, listen and appreciate the comments of others without feeling that I have to agree or disagree with them.<br>

Please accept my appologies for the big lump of text above but for some reason....probably cos I wrote so much.....that is how it came out!

It has not been my intention to twist your words however, this is an open forum and as such I am as entitled to question, comment, agree and disagree with the views of others as they are free to do the same to my views. If you wish to ignore my comments then, to be honest, it is no skin off my nose but if I am wrong then I welcome your rebuttal but that does not mean that I have to agree with your commentsTo avoid confusion I will use the magic of cut and paste so as not to twist the words of anyone"On the contrary, subscribers to this forum have indicated that youngsters are put off by the dress code that applies." If you are talking about modern dress then I think you will find at least as many comments giving the opposite view if you are not then maybe you would like to comment."What is wierd about about wearing a normal shirt with a collar and normal trousers? As for the neccessity to wear different colours on different days , now that is wierd, or unusual and not something I've encountered before." I have no problem with normal shirts or trousers but I take offence at the use of the word wierd as my own and my friends children like to wear colourful outfits yet they are still abiding by the clubs dress code."There appears to be a consensus of opinion that:1. Youngsters cannot be attracted to the game unless the dress code that applies in many clubs is relaxed." What has actually been said is that the likes of Ian Poulter's attire at the open makes our game more attractive to some youngsters who would not be attracted otherwise, surely this is not a bad thing."Generally speaking, i thought the standard of dress was high. However when the officials/management of any course permit players amateur or pro to dress down with what is in fact a glorfied tee shirt, or dress outrageously by exhibitionists, then sooner or later they attract people who that sort of thing appeals to." I certainly took your "dress outrageously" comment to refer to Ian Poulter, if I am wrong maybe you can clarify? But to say "they attract people who that sort of thing appeals to" does strike a nerve in me, who exactely are these people, are they lower class? hooligans?I won't cut and paste your comment re trainers, jeans, etc. I will however note that I have yet to see a comment stating that these things should be allowed. There seems to be concensus that some standards need to apply. With respect to T-Shirts, I personally don't wear them on the course but I wouldn't have a problem with someone who did as long as it is allowed in the dress code of the particular course. In fact the R&A and USGA seem to have set the standard for golfers by allowing them to be worn in their tournaments. If we are not prepared to accept people who look and dress differently to ourselves then we are being discriminatory and I would not want to partake of a sport which encourages discrimination of any kind.With respect to my comments re Ian Poulter. The thread is entitled "Dress Code" but if you read the start of and at least the first five messages in the thread they are only talking about Ian Poulter so if I have incorrectly attributed some of your comments as being towards IP then maybe you can see why.I would be interested to read your response. Whatever you choose, I will continue to post (and sometimes SHOUT and occasionally use such language as may be caused by others comments that make my blood boil)in these forums until such time as Bob or one of the others who run GM choose to censor me. I will also continue to read, listen and appreciate the comments of others without feeling that I have to agree or disagree with them.

Sorry for any confusion, just re-submitted message to make it more readable!

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz!

Thank you Gabriel, I now realise having read back thru the mails that your blood does indeed have a low boiling point reflected in your deep sensitivity. However for the sake of your blood pressure and health in general it's best not to shout.I still feel that the assertion that youngsters are put off from the game because of the dress code that applies to most clubs has little or no foundation in fact. However, if there is any other than ancedotal evidence that indicates I am wrong I will be pleased to apologise.I have no quarrel with bright colours, on the contrary, I wear them myself. There is however a difference between bright and garish. In the same way as the considerable difference in choice of apparel between the late Payne-Stewart and Ian Poulter. The former substantiated by the statistics was a great golfer. He was always immaculately dressed. He was also a wonderful raconteur a gifted musician, and entertainer. In short he had panache and style.

I agree entirely about Payne Stewart but time moves on and Ian Poulter is a different generation, different style. Love it or loathe it, it is unlikely to go away. As for statistics, Ian has many years ahead to see if he can match the record of Payne and its far to early in his career to try to compare the two of them in any way apart from attire.As for youngsters being put off....there is a big difference between being put off and being encouraged and I see no way to compare the two. As for evidence I very much doubt that there is any real evidence either way and I believe we will have to agree to disagree.....only time will tell.As for shouting, there is no simple option for me to use italics to emphasise words in my messages so sometimes I am shouting and other times I am just emphasising specific words! Who knows!!!! As for my low boiling point I will leave that for others to decide but having worked for 24 years in a high stress industry I finally had a breakdown 7 months ago which has led to me having more time for this wonderful game and if that has made me sensitive, so be it.....it takes all sorts.

Gabriel,I was truly sorry to read your last para.I wish you well and a healthy recovery.Peter

Peter, I'm fine, it's not like I've had an arm amputated or something, just trying to make you aware that when you comment on someones sensitivity or otherwise on here that you don't really know the people concerned, thats the great thing about web based forums.I wasn't loking for sympathy but your words are gratefully accepted.

And I do enjoy a good argument so don't let that stop you if you don't agree with any of my comments.

I am too lazy to read all of the above but would comment that......What the heck if wrong with a dress code?I played football... we all wore footy boots and the same kit!Cricket... all wore white!When I learned to play golf, I weas told that the convention is to wear golf shoes, proper trousers and a polo shirt. So, what's the big deal?I never got the urge to play cricket in jeans? Do those folk who object to the code also refuse to conform when playing other ports? (and, if I go a a course that insists on long socks with shorts, that's their business.. I'll play in long trousers or go elsewhere!

Ian, I was talking generally and trying to put forward an outsider's view point on golf dress code. As I said in another thread a few weeks ago, I personally am not affected by most golf-course dress codes as I tend to wear that polo shirt and casual trousers outfit anyway, golfing or not. Cricket I can't comment on, but football has practical requirements for dress code; that is, you have to instantly recognise who is on your team. Studded boots are practical, just like in golf. When I take absolute beginners to a compact or driving range, I explain the need for golfshoes and I get concurring nods and replies of "ah, I see". When I tell them that if they ever go to a proper course they will probably have to wear a shirt with a collar and smart trousers, there is an expectant silence as they await my explanation for this. (I wish I could say "well, as you turn your shoulders in the downswing, failure to wear a collar may provoke a violent slice"). Alas, often all I get are disbelieving looks as I say that's just the way things are. Believe me, it can really dampen the initial high of hitting their first good shots. For some, like me, having to wear long socks with shorts is a bit too much and unless by chance I happen to be wearing such socks, I'll go elsewhere. For absolute beginners who "wouldn't mind giving it a go", it just reinforces golf's external fuddy-duddy image, and the "elsewhere" is not to another golf course but to a different sport. Most adults will go along with the typical dress code demands. However, having to dress like a 40-year old doesn't do much to entice kids.(Please don't think I'm trying to promote some personnel grievance here - I, personally, have absolutely no problem with 99% of golf course codes and have no chip on my shoulder. But as someone who initiates a few people - adults and kids - every year, I'm just trying to give insiders here an outsider's viewpoint).

Ian, agree with your sentiments entirely.Golf is a game of dignity and respect. The dress code reflects the principals of the game.What other sport (apart from snooker) do you see players penalising themselves for a breach of rules.The T-Shirt situation?...personally I'm against it because the 'Give 'em an inch' adage springs to mind...the sleeves will become cap sleeves, then we'll see vests etc.It's the same with Shorts...they generally have to be tailored...not swimming or running shorts...WHY? because people would abuse it by wearing skin tight lycra pants or trunks. Look at what women are wearing on the Ladies Tours...it's like a fashion parade.Lets face it, would you like to see golfers running around the course with Lycra Pants or Tracksuit Bottoms and a Vest (sporting trainers).The argument about younger folk being put off the game because of dress code is rubbish. They'll gladly don a collar and trousers to get into a disco or night club...they don't say the night club is being stuffy do they?Golf Shoes...they must be worn both for the golfers safety and protection of the course. You can't go on a squash court with flip flops nor go ice skating with brogues on...so Golf Shoes...what's the big deal.

...and before anyone says 'owt about money, nearly every kid I see nowadays is wearing designer label apparel from head to toe.If they or their parents want 'em to play golf then they've got to follow the dress code. It'll save the parents some money and they'll look smarter in the process.In fact many kids today seem to have their baseball caps glued to their heads. Imagine 'em having to remove it on 18th to shake hands and then take it off completely to go in the club house...it'd put 'em off for life.What should be done about piercings? Many people nowadays have got eyebrows, nose, lips, tongue pierced. Is that a problem?It would be for me.

One of my playing partners takes the mick cos I take my cap off when shaking hands on the 18th.But he is a northerner! (come on lads let me have it then!)

IanYou are spot on...and us Northerners, at least most of my pals, observe that mark of respect to your opponent(s).Increasingly, we are seeing the Pros do it on almost every match in the Open.We do it in matchplay if the match is over before the 18th and if we continue to the 18th, we do it again.

Funny thing about the "what are young people wearing these days" arguement is that the fashion conscious "Yoof" is more likely to be wearing "Golfing" brands such as Burberry, Pingle, Polo, Lacoste and so on, and wouldn't be seen dead in jeans (jeans are what us oldies wear) and would rather wear a pair of smart shoes, sandals or expensive (and pristine) trainers. Those of you who attend football matches or have walked down a high street at pub closing time will know the look....if you saw these lads in the snooker room at the 19th you'd be thinking what a well turned out junior section they have here.....P.S. (As an aside no self respecting football hooligan would ever be seen dead draped in flags, replica shirts, scarves or with a painted face).

Yep. The hoolies are full of Burberry these days... ack to the days of the "casuals" in the early 80s! Anyone in a replica shirt is a fan "non violent!"I love your remark about the "well turned out juniors!"

The dress code for golf does not exclude being bright and fashionable. I in my mid 20`s and enjoy being fashionably dressed when playing golf. It is not about being outrageous but looking good. Even so i always wear trousers and a polo shirt with a collar but i have never heard that it is the tradition of the game to wear boring and dull colours.What we wear reflects our personalities not just bright colours means a lively person but it shows the thought and effort we put into the image which we wish to portray. Even the great Gary Player wore Black because he felt it gave him a image of confidence and success.By all means we must uphold the traditions of the game but that does not mean we can not blend the traditional with new ideas.