Paige Spiranac could lose huge following if Elon Musk takes over Twitter

A number of sports stars could stand to lose millions of followers as Elon Musk reportedly intends to remove a number of fake accounts from the platform.

Tue, 11 Oct 2022
Paige Spiranac could lose huge following if Elon Musk takes over Twitter

Popular social influencer and former professional golfer Paige Spiranac could stand to lose thousands of followers on Twitter if Elon Musk completes a takeover of the platform.

According to Picks Wise, Musk intends to remove a number of fake accounts from the popular social media platform if and when he completes the sensational purchase.

The most followed sports accounts were analysed by followeraudit.com and it found that Spiranac, who has 684,700 followers on Twitter, could lose up to 75,429 followers which is above 11% of her following.

The 29-year-old, who played college golf at the University of Arizona and San Diego State University, also has over 3.5 million followers on Instagram and 1.4 million followers on TikTok.

As well as one of the most followed people in the golf world, sports stars from other fields could also stand to lose a huge number of followers if Musk's takeover is to come to fruition.

Picks Wise reported that Manchester United and Portugal footballer Cristiano Ronaldo could lose 7,250,880 followers, which is roughly 7% of the staggering 103.9 million total he has.

According to influencermarketinghub.com, Ronaldo can earn $778,663 per sponsored post on Twitter. If he was to lose this forecasted amount of followers, he could lose $55,686 per post.

Of the top 10 sports people who could lose the most followers, seven of them are footballers. NBA legend LeBron James is ranked sixth on the list as the American could stand to lose 1,854,000 followers.

Since the news surrounding Musk, the 51-year-old CEO of Tesla, emerged, several US and international banks could lose up to $500 million if they continue with commitments made to fund the $44 billion takeover.

A number of banks, such as Bank of America and Barclays, decided to raise $13 billion in debt six months ago to fund the purchase.

As reported by the Guardian, around $400 million of the $500 million in losses that banks are predicted to have on the Twitter debt exist in unsecured, high-interest bonds.