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Golf tip: How to hit your drives further!

Exclusive tip from world record holder

Bob Warters's picture
Thu, 18 Feb 2010

Golf tip: How to hit your drives further!

Paul Slater holds the world record of 884 yards for the longest tee shot in golf. He tried to improved his record when the Muscular Dystrophy Campaign launched its Four Course Challenge at London City Airport at the weekend but managed a mere 598 yards in cold, windy conditions!

We asked Paul for his top tips for average golfers to hit the ball further and he responded that too many player try to launch their efforts on the backswing:

“I've watched hundreds of amateurs trying to hit a ball further and most will try to speed up everything, especially on their backswing.

"Doing this, actually slows the clubhead down at impact. Your focus should always be on timing and rhythm and creating as wide an arc as possible.

“Watch the professional golfers on your TV or at an event and you'll notice they all appear quite slow in their swing movements, yet they all hit the ball immense distances."

So what's his best tip for longer tee shots?

"My best tip is to suggest that next time you practice, try to keep your backswing, wide and slow and try to relax, keeping your arms tension free.  Do that successfully and then watch how much further the ball will fly when you focus on your downswing and a full follow through.”

For his record attempt, Paul Slater used a Cobra Pro D X-Speed driver with 5.5 degrees of loft and fitted with a UST V2 LD4 shaft. He used Pinnacle Gold golf balls
For further information about the Four Course Challenge and to participate, visit
www.fourcourseclassic.co.uk

FOOTNOTE: The Muscular Dystrophy Campaign is the leading UK charity focusing on muscle disease. It has pioneered the search for treatments and cures for over 50 years, and is dedicated to improving the lives of all babies, children and adults affected by muscle disease.   ? ?It funds world-class research to find effective treatments and cures; provides free practical and emotional support; campaigns to raise awareness and bring about change and awards grants towards the cost of specialist equipment, such as powered wheelchairs.

 

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