Golf balls guide 2019: Things you need to know

From construction and compression to dimples and spin, there is much to learn about golf balls.

Andy Roberts's picture
Tue, 6 Jun 2017
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The golf ball is the only piece of equipment you use on every shot, so it makes sense to use the best one for your game.

With myriad golf balls on the market, aimed at the whole range of abilities and backed up by befuddling science, that all-important purchase decision can be a complex one.

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That selection becomes even more clouded when brands have differing views on what is important when it comes to fitting a player to a golf ball.

To give you a head start, here are six key things to know about balls...

#1 - CONSTRUCTION

There are five types of golf ball construction available, each specifically designed for a particular style of play.

One piece: Typically used on driving ranges and crazy golf courses. Made from a solid sphere of Surlyn with moulded dimples, they are inexpensive and do not travel nearly as far as balls of other construction due to their lower compression.

Two piece: A popular combination of durability and distance. A solid core is then enclosed in the ball's cover. The firmer feel of a two-piece golf ball can provide more distance, but often at the expense of control and feel.

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Three piece: A solid rubber core is surrounded by a layer of enhanced liquid rubber, all encased in a softer, synthetic plastic cover. This allows better golfers to impart more spin and control it better around the greens.

Four piece: A combination of two-piece distance and three-piece feel, as pictured with the new Callaway Chrome Soft X golf ball above. A soft rubber core offering added distance is encased in two separate layers to aid spin. The urethane cover is the thinnest layer and gives the soft feel.

Five piece: A relatively new concept with each of the five layers designed to optimise performance in five key areas: driving, long irons, mid irons, short irons and short wedge shots. 

 

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