Draw or Fade to win a Masters?

Andy Roberts's picture
Thu, 30 Mar 2017

DRAW OR FADE TO WIN THE MASTERS? 

On paper, a draw for a right hander and a fade for a left hander would seem to come in handy.

Eleven of the 18 holes at Augusta require a right-to-left shot shape off the tee, most notably at the par-four 10th and par-five 13th. 

A draw travels further than a fade, but the fade lands more softly so if you're long enough it's a potent weapon.

Last year's champion Garcia is a natural drawer of the golf ball, and he said that definitely worked in his favour en route to his maiden major title. 

"My preferred shot shape is a draw, which came in very handy elsewhere during the Masters, especially on the par 5s, where I was 7-under for the week," said Garcia.

Two-time Masters champion Bubba Watson hits his left-handed fade as well as anybody. Add to that a deceptively vicious iron game and a creativity that nobody else can match, and you've got a perfect combination for a Masters champion.

"There are holes that hitting a cut makes it a lot easier," said fellow left-hander Mickelson.

"I think holes like 12, which is a very difficult par three, sits perfectly along a left-handed shot dispersion, short-left, long-right, so you aim at the middle of the green and you have a huge green to hit at.

"There's holes like that that sit better for left-handed players."

Draw or Fade to win a Masters?

Bucking the consensus, the right-handed Jack Nicklaus preferred a fade and won six Green Jackets, as too last 2016 winner Willett. Even his fellow Englishman Sir Nick Faldo won three Masters titles with a natural cut.

Basically, if you can work your golf ball both ways (*cough*, Bubba Watson, *cough*), you're one up on the competition before you've started.

NEXT MASTERS MYTH: DO YOU HAVE TO BIRDIE THE PAR-5 HOLES?